24 April 2017

  1. With few exceptions, stick fights with unpadded sticks without the aid of helmet and armor do not last very long. Its either one fighter surrendered or suffered a knock out or the referee stopped the...
  2. I took up the study of sport fencing in the early 1990s under Socorro Olivan. Besides being a fencing instructor, Olivan was also a blackbelt karateka and a champion judo player. With a couple of...
  3. Silat as a martial art is characterized by graceful dancelike movements. While it thrives in southern Philippines, silat in the strictest term is not an indigenous Filipino martial art (FMA). I...
  4. Of the many styles of Filipino martial arts (FMA), the most known for fighting with paired weapons is the Sinawali double sticks fighting style of Pampanga (sometimes called the “Estilo Macabebe”)....
  5.   Photos by Perry Gil S. Mallari The writer receiving instruction from Aeta archer Junior Soria on how to use the bow and arrow    The Aetas (also called Agtas) of the...
  6. Of the many foreign forces who have invaded the Philippines, the Spaniards were the only ones that made a tangible influence on the Filipino martial arts (FMA). The concept of espada y daga (sword...
  7. The dynamic movements of the Filipino martial arts (FMA) offer great potential for theatrical and cinematic purposes. The late FMA scholar Pedro Reyes wrote of how the FMA were introduced as a...
  8. There are many classifications of arnis; the better-known categories are arnis matador (combat arnis), arnis entablado (theatrical arnis), arnis jugado (sport arnis) and arnis guerrero (warrior arnis...
  9. In the olden days, there was no ranking system in arnis-escrima – it’s either you’re a teacher or you’re a student.  Originally, the art was taught one-on-one and though the very personal...
  10. Within farming communities in the Philippines even today, both young and old wear a bolo on their waists. It is amazing to watch the precision of these people as they use their bolos to unhusk a...
  11. The Filipino martial arts (FMA) are highly conceptual in nature. Understanding the underlying concepts of the FMA is the key to mastering the transition from weapon to weapon and to empty hand...
  12. Next to the Philippines, I would say that the United States is the second home of the Filipino martial arts (FMA). Transplanted mainly through various waves of migration, the FMA have established...
  13.     Various oraciones inscribed on a vest. This anting-anting was said to belong to General Macario Sakay.   The acquisition of  an “anting-anting,” an object...
  14. While the knife was said to be the backbone of the Filipino martial arts (FMA), the stick is its most popular weapon hence arnis-escrima is always identified with stick fighting.  As a weapon...
  15. Photo by Perry Gil S. Mallari   The Simon de Anda y Salazar monument in Manila  The years 1762 to 1764 are of primary interest to researchers and scholars of the Filipino...
  16. Illustration by Perry Gil S. Mallari The Palawan blowgun described by Antonio Pigafetta in his chronicles nearly 500-years ago still exists in Sabah, Malaysia today. Not too many styles of...
  17. Long before the balisong made its debut in Hollywood through the efforts of Dan Inosanto and Jeff Imada (the balisong was once dubbed “The Nunchaku of the 80s”), the Filipino butterfly knife had...
  18. I was exposed to hilot (The ancient Filipino healing art of bone-setting and therapeutic massage) as a small child, long before I studied the Filipino martial arts of arnis-escrima. My uncle, the...
  19. While it is not highlighted in Philippine history, the first Filipino martyr for freedom was a Pampango, a Macabebe in particular. When Spanish forces under the leadership of Don Miguel Lopez de...
  20. Text and photo by Perry Gil S. Mallari - June 10, 2009 The writer practicing espada y daga   Pragmatism is one of the foremost tenets of the Filipino Martial Arts (FMA). A common...

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